Now Playing Tracks

The pangolin was in no danger of falling off—he’d anchored the rope with a silver spoon, which is one of the seven orthodox ways of roping a star, and the only one that doesn’t require radioactive elements or a live banana slug—but the star’s occasional random twitches were starting to make him a little queasy.

"I don’t suppose you can twitch a little less?" he called up.

"Sorry," said the star, with an apologetic twitch, "can’t help it. My mother was a pulsar." - Ursula Vernon

bigcatawareness:

zooophagous:

blackbonestoeat:

zooophagous:

blackbonestoeat:

zooophagous:

kenzie-sweetpea:

sixpenceee:

Hercules is a 900-pound-heavy, 6-feet-tall and 12-feet-long liger who holds the Guinness World Record for the largest cat. Born from a lion father and tiger mother, Hercules grew into an impressive creature, able to run at speeds of up to 50 mph and eat 100 pounds of food in one sitting. Despite his gigantic size, Hercules is very tame and Dr. Bhagavan, one of the liger’s caretakers, says looking into his eyes is “like looking into God’s own eyes”. (Source)

bigcatawareness
Is he really, really fat?

I’m not sure I buy that this poor suffering creature can run 50 mph, but even if he can’t do that, he should also probably not be eating 100lbs of meat in one sitting. IF that’s something he can actually do (because color me skeptical) it’d probably be a pretty big reason why he’s that ungodly fat.
The other reason is that ligers lack a growth inhibitor gene because of their parentage, meaning their poor bodies don’t know when to stop growing, meaning they do indeed become giants. As it turns out, being a giant isn’t good for you.
Giant humans often have drastically shorter life spans due to painful bone disorders and cardiac problems (imagine if you suddenly got twice as big as you are now but your heart stayed more or less the same size) and their bodies work really hard to just be normal. It can lead to chronic pain, spinal deformities, heart problems and even poor vision.
He’s being slowly choked to death by his own over-functioning pituitary gland.

That’s not exactly correct…
Ligers do suffer from growth dysplasia, but not in a way that a lot of species do. Because of their breeding, they only suffer from a “small” form of it and eventually they do stop growing. Unlike humans who will continue to grow if they do not get their Gigantism treated.Most known Ligers live into their twenties. (Lions have a lifespan of up to of 10 - 14 years or can live past twenty years in captivity. Whereas tigers 20 to 26 years in captivity — it’s hard to get a decent age in the wild seeing as what the life of a wild tiger can be like). This means they live about the normal life span of their mixes.It’s a pretty common misconception that Ligers continue to grow all of their lives or that they tend to die young.Hercules here is considered non-obese and in good health. They expect him to live a long life.The interbreeding between lions and tigers stretches back into history pretty far. From Indian royalty to Carnival workers. They even think that lions and tigers may have mated in the wild at one point. Before the Asiatic Lion became endangered and were more prolific, tigers and lions territory overlapped — so it wouldn’t be surprising if there were Ligers out there for a long time!

It’d be pretty hard to claim that this animal could survive in the wild, if only because it’d have a hard time feeding itself at a whopping 900 pounds. Especially considering that in areas where lions and tigers overlap, they’re competitors and not friends. Just because it’s “possible” that they could potentially breed in the wild doesn’t mean it actually happens, or at least happens and bears living offspring that live normal healthy lives. I’d love to see an actual scientific source for these humongous half-breeds existing in the wild at all other than “they think.”
Lions can also breed with leopards and their ranges overlap, but you don’t see lion-leopard crossbreeds roaming the savanna. That’s largely because lions and leopards, though they live nearby and technically CAN mate, have very different social lives and also happen to hate each other. The exact same reasons you don’t see wild ligers, really.
Indian royalty and carnivals are also hardly the go-to people you should ask for advice on keeping and breeding large wild cats in captivity. “Small” gigantism or not, there’s a reason lions and tigers don’t reach 900lbs (or 1,000lbs with the “100lbs” of meat in his belly is true) These animals aren’t meant to be horse-sized and really, they DO suffer from health defects because of it.
I’d be willing to bet cash money that the reason that Hercules here is so tame is because he doesn’t have the energy to be as pushy or rambunctious as a regular lion or tiger. It’s the same reason puppies with hip dysplasia are often touted by their owners as “such good puppies”- when they’re in pain they don’t act out. Trouble with an animal in pain is, unless an actual injury shows up on an x-ray, you’ll probably never know if its in pain or not because of how stoic they are.
In every video I’ve seen of Hercules, there’s an annoying voiceover for how “healthy” he is and how much “hybrid vigor” he has, but he appears to be laboring for breath and panting heavily in almost every shot, and slowly goes about even the most basic of physical activities. They claim he can run as fast as a race horse even though he almost weighs as much as one but if you ask me, he already looks like he walks like an old man.
There’s no such thing as a responsible liger breeder, and the risk to the parents and to the offspring of lion-tiger matings are too high to justify the risks. There’s no reason a liger needs to exist and a lot of reasons why making more of them is a stupid idea.
http://bigcatawareness.tumblr.com/tagged/liger
It kind of boggles my mind that people can breed a mixed-species animal that’s not only prone to, but specifically famous for and NAMED AFTER its potentially painful and debilitating birth defect (“Hercules”? Really?) and then go on to claim that it’s “very healthy”.

I didn’t claim a Liger could live in the wild alone, nor was that what my response was about at all. I’m confused as to why you’re trying to debunk something I never stated instead of the stuff I pointed out wrong about your post. But, here we go I suppose.
I do not claim a Liger could live in the wild, they suspect that they may have. The fun thing about science, learning about animals and history is that we’re constantly learning. Often times, we produce a theory and say “This could happen, let’s look into it and see what we can find!” I didn’t say they /did/ live in the wild or even could, I said there is a possibility that one point they did. They’re still learning about big cats, what makes you think they have all the answers straight up?
As for your random comment on leopards and lions mating — I feel you may be confused as to how they make hybrids and why they do not as often mate in the wild. Leopards may live in the same area as lions, but they don’t often live together. If they live together, mating isn’t at all uncommon and does tend to happen often. This is how they breed hybrids (they did try article insemination and it didn’t work). If you put two of these big cats together, in a situation where they live together, they will mate. And actually, Lipards can actually mate, unlike Ligers. They aren’t infertile.
Yet again, I didn’t say Indian Royalty and Carnival workers are where you should go for information. I was putting some history behind the Liger into the post. Because, history is EXTREMELY important — especially when it comes to animals. Otherwise, we might as well just go “Look, big cat.” and never be bothered with them again.
Hercules is more than likely tame, like most Ligers, because he tends to take after the lion in this sense. Lions are quite tame in captivity (which, sadly makes them extremely popular with people who own big cats in their backyards). Lions don’t like to swim, but Tigers and Ligers do. Anything mixed is going to take things from both species. I have a mixed breed dog, he shows common traits from Terriers and Dachshunds. The logic that he doesn’t act out because he has no energy is ridiculous. With this logic, lions also have no energy, as they tend to laze about often — even more so in captivity. Hell, even outside of captivity, most lions spend most of their days sleeping.While I don’t know if he can eat 100lbs of meat or not (I would imagine he could, sitting at 900lbs, 100 isn’t a lot. A normal lion can eat up to 66 lbs if they are gorging themselves, which is where the 100 may come from with Hercules, as it is probably not the average meal for him. Tigers can eat up to 60 lbs in one sitting, not gorging themselves.) So, with this extra size it wouldn’t actually be insane for him to eat 100lbs considering how much he weighs. Bigger things eat more.
While I agree he probably isn’t that fast, as the larger the animal the slower they tend to be. I will however say it isn’t super impossible. Female lions can run up to 50 mphs and tigers up to 40 mphs. I’ve not ever seen Hercules run.
Also, I want to point out that when I say he has a small form of Gigantism, he does. “Gigantism applies to animals that exceed 1 tonne”.
I’m not really sure what “but specifically famous for and NAMED AFTER its potentially painful and debilitating birth defect (“Hercules”? Really?)” that means. One would assume he was named Hercules after the divine hero — who was known for his strength. I’m also not say he’s healthy, I’m saying your information isn’t wholly right and if you wish to comment and advocate for something you should probably do more research, as it’s extremely important to do so. If incorrect information is spread it makes the whole advocation for the animal seem like bullshit. “Oh, a bunch of made up facts. Don’t trust them.” and is the reason a lot of animal advocation is ignored.Animal gigantism & evolution: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/is-there-any-evolutionary/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hybrid_growth_disorders
http://ligerfacts.org/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panthera_hybrid
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liger

I’m not sure why the history of the animals is relevant at all. You tell me to do more research, but then come back with statements starting with “most likely.” I don’t know, what’s more likely to you? That an animal who grew to more than the weight of his mother and father combined is just “really tame” or that he’s actually suffering strain from his medical condition the same as just about any other mammal that suffers from gigantism? Is there any animal in which “gigantism” can be called “healthy?”
As for their history of being bred for circuses and Indian royalty, what does that exactly prove? That people have been exploiting big cats for a very long time? The only thing it would serve to illustrate is that they knew they could breed the animals and wanted to make money off of them even back then.
And then you stated that it ‘could’ exist in the wild as if that statement meant anything. Mules can also exist in the wild but you don’t see lots and lots of wild mules roaming the steppes even in areas where horses and donkeys overlap, and a mule, unlike a liger, wouldn’t even really have trouble fitting in anywhere. Furthermore, there’s not really any case I’ve ever been able to find of a wild liger. Not even a RUMOR of a wild liger or a fake sighting, let alone a confirmed one, so what exactly did it add to say that they could maybe possibly exist in the wild? What information did I even put out there that was “wrong” or made up?
I said that he’s huge because he’s lacking a growth inhibiter gene so he’s a freakishly abnormal size. Which is true. I also said that gigantism leads to painful growth disorders and can also lead to heart trouble, which is ALSO true. You came back with “They could have lived in the wild for a long time!”
So far the only thing I’ve seen that’s “wrong” from my post is that my original wording implied that they grow for their entire lives, when they don’t. They tend to max out at about 5 or 6 years old. But they max out at pretty freakishly large sizes.
Even the sources you posted trying to prove me “wrong” have factoids like this:
“
And ligers are not healthy either. They have a shorter life expectancy and plenty of them have genetic problems. There have been many instances when ligers have incomplete DNA.
 Some people argue that they are depressed too, and while this is a theory worth considering, it is not yet backed up by scientific data”
So even what you ‘researched’ about them seems to agree with ME more than you, actually. The same source also goes on to state that the notion of ligers in the wild is a moot point because they not only don’t happen, but even if they did, it’s not a good reason to create them in a zoo.

zooophagous is already killing it but can i just point out that this person’s sources and ideas of “research” pretty much all consist of Wikipedia?  Also the statement that “lions are quite tame in captivity” just because lions sleep a lot.
Laugh with me.

I don’t know if personal observation means anything to you folks, but I saw a liger in person once and he looked and acted quite healthy.  It may even have been Hercules, though it was some time ago and I don’t remember the name.  He wasn’t panting and he moved fluidly, though of course I didn’t see him chase anything down.  
A big predator in the wild is often on the sharp edge of hunger.  If a wild lion could catch all the food it wanted, I imagine it would be heavier than the ones we see in photos.  
Zoom Info

bigcatawareness:

zooophagous:

blackbonestoeat:

zooophagous:

blackbonestoeat:

zooophagous:

kenzie-sweetpea:

sixpenceee:

Hercules is a 900-pound-heavy, 6-feet-tall and 12-feet-long liger who holds the Guinness World Record for the largest cat. Born from a lion father and tiger mother, Hercules grew into an impressive creature, able to run at speeds of up to 50 mph and eat 100 pounds of food in one sitting. Despite his gigantic size, Hercules is very tame and Dr. Bhagavan, one of the liger’s caretakers, says looking into his eyes is “like looking into God’s own eyes”. (Source)

bigcatawareness
Is he really, really fat?

I’m not sure I buy that this poor suffering creature can run 50 mph, but even if he can’t do that, he should also probably not be eating 100lbs of meat in one sitting. IF that’s something he can actually do (because color me skeptical) it’d probably be a pretty big reason why he’s that ungodly fat.

The other reason is that ligers lack a growth inhibitor gene because of their parentage, meaning their poor bodies don’t know when to stop growing, meaning they do indeed become giants. As it turns out, being a giant isn’t good for you.

Giant humans often have drastically shorter life spans due to painful bone disorders and cardiac problems (imagine if you suddenly got twice as big as you are now but your heart stayed more or less the same size) and their bodies work really hard to just be normal. It can lead to chronic pain, spinal deformities, heart problems and even poor vision.

He’s being slowly choked to death by his own over-functioning pituitary gland.

That’s not exactly correct…

Ligers do suffer from growth dysplasia, but not in a way that a lot of species do. Because of their breeding, they only suffer from a “small” form of it and eventually they do stop growing. Unlike humans who will continue to grow if they do not get their Gigantism treated.

Most known Ligers live into their twenties. (Lions have a lifespan of up to of 10 - 14 years or can live past twenty years in captivity. Whereas tigers 20 to 26 years in captivity — it’s hard to get a decent age in the wild seeing as what the life of a wild tiger can be like). This means they live about the normal life span of their mixes.

It’s a pretty common misconception that Ligers continue to grow all of their lives or that they tend to die young.

Hercules here is considered non-obese and in good health. They expect him to live a long life.

The interbreeding between lions and tigers stretches back into history pretty far. From Indian royalty to Carnival workers. They even think that lions and tigers may have mated in the wild at one point. Before the Asiatic Lion became endangered and were more prolific, tigers and lions territory overlapped — so it wouldn’t be surprising if there were Ligers out there for a long time!

It’d be pretty hard to claim that this animal could survive in the wild, if only because it’d have a hard time feeding itself at a whopping 900 pounds. Especially considering that in areas where lions and tigers overlap, they’re competitors and not friends. Just because it’s “possible” that they could potentially breed in the wild doesn’t mean it actually happens, or at least happens and bears living offspring that live normal healthy lives. I’d love to see an actual scientific source for these humongous half-breeds existing in the wild at all other than “they think.”

Lions can also breed with leopards and their ranges overlap, but you don’t see lion-leopard crossbreeds roaming the savanna. That’s largely because lions and leopards, though they live nearby and technically CAN mate, have very different social lives and also happen to hate each other. The exact same reasons you don’t see wild ligers, really.

Indian royalty and carnivals are also hardly the go-to people you should ask for advice on keeping and breeding large wild cats in captivity. “Small” gigantism or not, there’s a reason lions and tigers don’t reach 900lbs (or 1,000lbs with the “100lbs” of meat in his belly is true) These animals aren’t meant to be horse-sized and really, they DO suffer from health defects because of it.

I’d be willing to bet cash money that the reason that Hercules here is so tame is because he doesn’t have the energy to be as pushy or rambunctious as a regular lion or tiger. It’s the same reason puppies with hip dysplasia are often touted by their owners as “such good puppies”- when they’re in pain they don’t act out. Trouble with an animal in pain is, unless an actual injury shows up on an x-ray, you’ll probably never know if its in pain or not because of how stoic they are.

In every video I’ve seen of Hercules, there’s an annoying voiceover for how “healthy” he is and how much “hybrid vigor” he has, but he appears to be laboring for breath and panting heavily in almost every shot, and slowly goes about even the most basic of physical activities. They claim he can run as fast as a race horse even though he almost weighs as much as one but if you ask me, he already looks like he walks like an old man.

There’s no such thing as a responsible liger breeder, and the risk to the parents and to the offspring of lion-tiger matings are too high to justify the risks. There’s no reason a liger needs to exist and a lot of reasons why making more of them is a stupid idea.

http://bigcatawareness.tumblr.com/tagged/liger

It kind of boggles my mind that people can breed a mixed-species animal that’s not only prone to, but specifically famous for and NAMED AFTER its potentially painful and debilitating birth defect (“Hercules”? Really?) and then go on to claim that it’s “very healthy”.

I didn’t claim a Liger could live in the wild alone, nor was that what my response was about at all. I’m confused as to why you’re trying to debunk something I never stated instead of the stuff I pointed out wrong about your post. But, here we go I suppose.

I do not claim a Liger could live in the wild, they suspect that they may have. The fun thing about science, learning about animals and history is that we’re constantly learning. Often times, we produce a theory and say “This could happen, let’s look into it and see what we can find!” I didn’t say they /did/ live in the wild or even could, I said there is a possibility that one point they did. They’re still learning about big cats, what makes you think they have all the answers straight up?

As for your random comment on leopards and lions mating — I feel you may be confused as to how they make hybrids and why they do not as often mate in the wild. Leopards may live in the same area as lions, but they don’t often live together. If they live together, mating isn’t at all uncommon and does tend to happen often. This is how they breed hybrids (they did try article insemination and it didn’t work). If you put two of these big cats together, in a situation where they live together, they will mate. And actually, Lipards can actually mate, unlike Ligers. They aren’t infertile.

Yet again, I didn’t say Indian Royalty and Carnival workers are where you should go for information. I was putting some history behind the Liger into the post. Because, history is EXTREMELY important — especially when it comes to animals. Otherwise, we might as well just go “Look, big cat.” and never be bothered with them again.

Hercules is more than likely tame, like most Ligers, because he tends to take after the lion in this sense. Lions are quite tame in captivity (which, sadly makes them extremely popular with people who own big cats in their backyards). Lions don’t like to swim, but Tigers and Ligers do. Anything mixed is going to take things from both species. I have a mixed breed dog, he shows common traits from Terriers and Dachshunds. The logic that he doesn’t act out because he has no energy is ridiculous. With this logic, lions also have no energy, as they tend to laze about often — even more so in captivity. Hell, even outside of captivity, most lions spend most of their days sleeping.

While I don’t know if he can eat 100lbs of meat or not (I would imagine he could, sitting at 900lbs, 100 isn’t a lot. A normal lion can eat up to 66 lbs if they are gorging themselves, which is where the 100 may come from with Hercules, as it is probably not the average meal for him. Tigers can eat up to 60 lbs in one sitting, not gorging themselves.) So, with this extra size it wouldn’t actually be insane for him to eat 100lbs considering how much he weighs. Bigger things eat more.

While I agree he probably isn’t that fast, as the larger the animal the slower they tend to be. I will however say it isn’t super impossible. Female lions can run up to 50 mphs and tigers up to 40 mphs. I’ve not ever seen Hercules run.

Also, I want to point out that when I say he has a small form of Gigantism, he does. “Gigantism applies to animals that exceed 1 tonne”.

I’m not really sure what “but specifically famous for and NAMED AFTER its potentially painful and debilitating birth defect (“Hercules”? Really?)” that means. One would assume he was named Hercules after the divine hero — who was known for his strength. I’m also not say he’s healthy, I’m saying your information isn’t wholly right and if you wish to comment and advocate for something you should probably do more research, as it’s extremely important to do so. If incorrect information is spread it makes the whole advocation for the animal seem like bullshit. “Oh, a bunch of made up facts. Don’t trust them.” and is the reason a lot of animal advocation is ignored.

Animal gigantism & evolution: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/is-there-any-evolutionary/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hybrid_growth_disorders

http://ligerfacts.org/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panthera_hybrid

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liger

I’m not sure why the history of the animals is relevant at all. You tell me to do more research, but then come back with statements starting with “most likely.” I don’t know, what’s more likely to you? That an animal who grew to more than the weight of his mother and father combined is just “really tame” or that he’s actually suffering strain from his medical condition the same as just about any other mammal that suffers from gigantism? Is there any animal in which “gigantism” can be called “healthy?”

As for their history of being bred for circuses and Indian royalty, what does that exactly prove? That people have been exploiting big cats for a very long time? The only thing it would serve to illustrate is that they knew they could breed the animals and wanted to make money off of them even back then.

And then you stated that it ‘could’ exist in the wild as if that statement meant anything. Mules can also exist in the wild but you don’t see lots and lots of wild mules roaming the steppes even in areas where horses and donkeys overlap, and a mule, unlike a liger, wouldn’t even really have trouble fitting in anywhere. Furthermore, there’s not really any case I’ve ever been able to find of a wild liger. Not even a RUMOR of a wild liger or a fake sighting, let alone a confirmed one, so what exactly did it add to say that they could maybe possibly exist in the wild? What information did I even put out there that was “wrong” or made up?

I said that he’s huge because he’s lacking a growth inhibiter gene so he’s a freakishly abnormal size. Which is true. I also said that gigantism leads to painful growth disorders and can also lead to heart trouble, which is ALSO true. You came back with “They could have lived in the wild for a long time!”

So far the only thing I’ve seen that’s “wrong” from my post is that my original wording implied that they grow for their entire lives, when they don’t. They tend to max out at about 5 or 6 years old. But they max out at pretty freakishly large sizes.

Even the sources you posted trying to prove me “wrong” have factoids like this:

And ligers are not healthy either. They have a shorter life expectancy and plenty of them have genetic problems. There have been many instances when ligers have incomplete DNA.

Some people argue that they are depressed too, and while this is a theory worth considering, it is not yet backed up by scientific data”

So even what you ‘researched’ about them seems to agree with ME more than you, actually. The same source also goes on to state that the notion of ligers in the wild is a moot point because they not only don’t happen, but even if they did, it’s not a good reason to create them in a zoo.

zooophagous is already killing it but can i just point out that this person’s sources and ideas of “research” pretty much all consist of Wikipedia?  Also the statement that “lions are quite tame in captivity” just because lions sleep a lot.

Laugh with me.

I don’t know if personal observation means anything to you folks, but I saw a liger in person once and he looked and acted quite healthy.  It may even have been Hercules, though it was some time ago and I don’t remember the name.  He wasn’t panting and he moved fluidly, though of course I didn’t see him chase anything down.  

A big predator in the wild is often on the sharp edge of hunger.  If a wild lion could catch all the food it wanted, I imagine it would be heavier than the ones we see in photos.  

We make Tumblr themes